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3.19 Safe Sleep for Babies and Infants

Contents

1. Introduction

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS, previously known as “cot death”), is the sudden, unexpected and unexplained death of an otherwise healthy baby. SIDS is rare, however approximately 240 children die per year in the UK due to SIDS. Most deaths happen during the first 6 months of a baby’s life, but cases have been seen in children up to the age of 1 year. While no single likely cause has been identified, experts know there are a number of risk factors and preventative measures that parents can take to ensure their babies are sleeping as safely as possible.

The Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth and Southampton Safeguarding Partnerships (HIPS) have agreed to deliver the same key safer sleep messages across the areas. Some areas may use existing information from agencies such as The Lullaby Trust whilst others may develop their own resources, however, the messages will be consistent.

The following procedure outlines the HIPS Safeguarding Partnership agreed procedure adopted collaboratively so families receive a uniformed approach of consistent safer sleep messages from agencies. 

2. Aims

  • To reduce the death rate of babies and infants by identifying and assessing where babies sleep and maximising the ability of parents and/or carers to implement safer sleep practices
  • To reduce the number of babies and infants who are put to sleep in unsafe conditions by ensuring that clear and consistent safer sleep messages are delivered to and understood by parents/carers
  • To empower staff across the agencies to identify safer sleep concerns and work with parents/carers to address and mitigate any risks
  • To provide an evidence base for professionals to refer to when discussing safer sleep message with parents/carers.
  • If, following receipt of safer sleep messages and advice the level of risk is sufficient to cause professional concern, or should a parent/carer choose not to follow safer sleep messages and advice, all professionals must document their concerns and what they've done to mitigate them. Professionals could consider, with consent, contacting the family’s health visitor to ask for their advice. Professionals should consider any barriers that may be impacting on parenting capacity (including learning difficulties, substance misuse, mental health issues, and poverty) and if safeguarding concerns persist, professionals should refer to the neglect guidance and follow internal safeguarding procedures.

3. Safer Sleep Principles and Key Messages

Co-Sleeping and Bed-sharing

Choosing to co-sleep with a baby is a very personal choice and some parents will choose to do so. This means that their baby shares the same bed with an adult for most of the night and not just to be comforted or fed. Some parents choose to co-sleep with their baby in other places such as on a mat, on a futon, on a water bed, an air mattress or on blankets and duvets on the floor. The risks associated with these alternative sleeping arrangements are significantly higher. These sleeping arrangements are therefore not recommended.

It is vital that professionals support parents to make informed choices and to ensure that these choices are made with full awareness and understanding of the potential risks, as well as ways to mitigate/reduce these risks.  See below.

When to strongly advise against co-sleeping

It is important for parents and carers to understand that there are some circumstances in which co-sleeping with their baby can be very dangerous and is strongly discouraged. This is when:

  • either parent/partner smokes (even if they do not smoke in the bedroom)
  • either parent/partner has drunk alcohol or taken drugs. This includes prescribed medications that may cause drowsiness.
  • either parent/partner is extremely tired
  • the baby was born premature (37 weeks or less)
  • the baby was born at a low weight (2.5kg or 5½ lbs or less)
  • co-sleeping is on a sofa or armchair with a baby- this can increase the risk of SIDS by 50 tim

The safest place for a baby to sleep for the first 6 months is in a separate cot or Moses basket in the same room as parents/carers.

Professionals are reminded of the criminal offence of Overlay; this relates to the cause of death for an infant less than 3 years of age being due to suffocation (not caused by disease/ foreign body). This is when:

  • the infant has been in bed with a person who is 16 years old or over
  • the person was under the influence of drink or a prohibited drug either when they went to bed or at any later time before the suffocation (includes any kind of furniture or surface used for sleeping).

Sleeping Position

Parents and carers should be advised to always place their baby on their back to sleep, not on their front or side, unless there is medical advice to do otherwise. A major UK study found that babies placed on their tummy to sleep were at 6 times the risk of SIDS compared to a baby placed on their back. Side sleeping also increases the risk. No research has found any increased risk of choking for babies lying on their backs. If a baby rolls onto their tummy, turn them back again. However, once they can roll from front to back and back to their front again, you can leave them to find their own sleeping position. Babies need to sleep with their feet at the end of the cot, pram or Moses basket and always ensure their head and face are uncovered

Sleep environment/equipment

The choice of products can feel overwhelming for parents, and best advice is to keep it simple.

The safest place for a baby to sleep is on their own firm, flat and waterproof mattress that is in good condition, in the same room as their parents/carers, for at least the first six months. A Moses basket or cot, free from toys, bumpers and other materials, is a safe place for a baby to sleep.

  • A cot, pram and Moses basket with a firm flat mattress that is protected by a waterproof cover to keep it clean and dry. A new one is recommended. Ensure the mattress fits the cot, pram or Moses basket properly with no gaps around the edges.
  • There is some research to suggest an increased chance of SIDS when using a second-hand mattress brought in from outside of the family home, although the link is not yet proven. To help reduce this risk, if parents/carers are using a second-hand mattress for their baby, make sure that the chosen mattress was previously completely protected by a waterproof cover, with no rips or tears and is in good condition. The mattress should also still be firm and flat to keep the baby sleeping safely.
  • Babies should be positioned in the feet-to-foot position (feet at the bottom of the Moses basket/cot).
  • The use of pods, nests, hammocks, sleep positioners, cot bumpers, pillows, soft cushion or thick heavy bedding is unsafe and not recommended.
  • Sheets and blankets should be firmly tucked in and not above shoulder height. A baby sleep bag that is a good fit for the baby is safe for a baby to sleep in. A good fit is described as fitting well around the shoulders so that the baby’s head does not slip down into the sleeping bag.  A well-fitting sleeping bag is recommended by the Lullaby Trust as it reduces the risk of loose sheets and blankets .Loose bedding causing overheating and covering babies’ heads that increase the risk of SIDS. The right tog rating and under-layers need to be checked and a room thermometer used, to create a safer sleeping environment and help parents reduce the risk of overheating.
  • Advice for parents and carers when buying baby sleeping products:
    • Does it comply with British Standards? If so, it should say on the product itself, its packaging, instructions or website.
    • If the item is something for the baby to sleep on, such as a mattress. Is the mattress firm? (baby’s head should not sink in by more than a few millimetres) entirely flat with no raised or cushioned areas?
    • Does it have a waterproof cover?

British Standard does not mean that a product helps to reduce the chance of SIDS, it just guarantees a certain level of general safety (e.g. will not fall apart or set fire easily). You should also carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions for any product you buy and contact the manufacturer directly with any questions. Research by the Lullaby Trust shows that 41% of parents have or intend to buy baby sleep nests and pods which don’t comply with safer sleep guidelines. See this video link below by the Lullaby Trust on how to choose safe sleeping products: https://bit.ly/2IzJBBn .

Despite being sold by many well-known brands, items such as cushioned sleeping pods, nests, baby hammocks and anything that wedges or straps a baby in place can pose a risk to babies less than 12 months of age.  Families should be encouraged not to use sleep aids and if they do make this choice, to check whether items comply with British Standards and follow safer sleep advice.

  • Overheating: advise parents/carers to check their baby regularly to make sure they are not too hot. Feel their tummy or nape of their neck as the baby’s hands or feet may be cooler. Aim for the temperature in your baby’s room to be between 16-20 degrees centigrade. Parents and carers should be advised if their baby feels hot and sweaty, to remove one or more layers of clothing, bedclothes or bedding. They should keep checking their baby and a useful tip is to check their baby whenever they feel hot or cold.
  • Room thermometer: to monitor the room temperature. The optimum room temperature is 18C. So ensure a room temperature of, between 16C-20C. Babies are not able to regulate their own temperature very well and therefore can overheat easily. Babies do not need to wear a hat indoors and will not usually need to be wrapped in additional layers. It is important to ensure that babies are not sleeping near a radiator.
  • Pillows can increase the risk of SIDS. Pillow use alone has been shown to increase the chance of SIDS occurring by up to 2.5 times up to the age of 1 year.
  • Many babies will fall asleep in a car seat; however travel systems and car seats should not be used as a routine sleep environment or for long periods of time. Once the parent/carer has arrived at their destination, the baby should be removed from the car seat and placed in their cot/Moses basket/travel cot.
  • Most car manufacturers recommend that babies should not be in a car seat for longer than 2 hours at a time and they should be taken out frequently (The Lullaby Trust 2019).
  • If your trip involves driving for long periods of time, you should stop for regular breaks for 15 minutes or more to allow the baby to stretch and move around.
  • Ideally, a second adult should travel in the back of the car with your baby, or if travelling alone use a mirror to keep an eye on your baby.
  • Use the TICKS guidance below as recommended by Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) for baby carriers and slings to ensure a baby’s airway does not become blocked. T.I.C.K.S is the universal safety acronym for baby-wearing, it stands for:
  • Tight
  • In view at all times
  • Close enough to kiss
  • Keep the chin off chest
  • Supported back

Promoting Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is a protective factor in reducing the risk of SIDS. As long ago as 1965, it was shown that babies under 3 months who died of SIDS were less likely to be breastfed than infants who did not die. Since then, numerous studies have supported the protective effects of breastfeeding, with one overview report concluding that breastfeeding reduces the incidence of SIDS by approximately half.

Even if a mum can only breastfeed for a few days, this is still beneficial and offers some protection. The Department of Health and Social Care recommends breastfeeding for as long as possible, ideally exclusively for the first six months. After six months, breastfeeding is encouraged with the addition of suitable weaning foods for as long as the mother and baby want to continue breastfeeding.

Cigarette Smoking/E-Cigarette Use

Research suggests that the risk of SIDS is significantly higher for babies who share a bed with a parent/carer who smokes cigarettes. Exposure to cigarette smoke during pregnancy has also been linked to an increased risk of SIDS. Based on the available evidence, it is therefore advised that babies should not co-sleep with a parent who smokes cigarettes, even if they do not smoke around the baby. As well as advice on not co-sleeping, parents and carers should also be advised to change clothes and wash hands to eliminate exposure to smoke.

As there is no direct research on using e cigarettes and SIDS, we suggest parents and carers are advised not share a bed with their baby if you use e cigarettes. Using an e cigarette appears to be much safer than continuing to smoke; both in pregnancy and once the baby is born but safest option is to give up smoking entirely (The Lullaby Trust 2019).  Please follow this link to NHS advice for stop smoking services.

Swaddling

Swaddling may help some babies to settle and sleep for longer. If parents/carers do decide to swaddle their baby, the following is advice to do this more safely.

  • Swaddling should be done for each day and night-time sleep as part of a regular routine:
  • Use thin materials
  • Do not swaddle above the shoulders
  • Never put a swaddled baby to sleep on their front
  • Do not swaddle too tight
  • Check the baby’s temperature to ensure they do not get too hot
  • Never sleep on a sofa or in an armchair with the baby as this greatly increases the risk of SIDS by 50 times

Dummy/ Pacifier Use

There have been many studies which has linked the use of a dummy when the baby is placed down to sleep with a significantly reduced risk of SIDS. The Lullaby Trust offers the following advice based on the available research;

  • If parents choose to use a dummy, wait until breastfeeding is well established (at around 4 weeks of age).
  • Stop giving a dummy to a baby to go to sleep between 6 and 12 months.
  • Don’t force a baby to take a dummy or put it back in if the baby spits it out.
  • Don’t use a neck cord.
  • Don’t put anything sweet on the dummy, and don’t offer whilst baby is awake.
  • Using an orthodontic dummy is best as it adapts to a baby’s mouth shape.
  • If parents choose to use a dummy, advise that it should be part of the baby’s regular sleep routine.

See Lullaby Trust dummy fact sheet: https://bit.ly/2Uod2bB

Cultural Diversity

Some cultures may view co-sleeping with their babies as an essential and normal part of the parent-child journey; however all parents/carers must still be made aware of the associated risks in order to make informed choices.  Consideration should also be given to those who for example may be seeking asylum and therefore may not have had access to safe sleep messages in their country of origin or access to safe sleep equipment such as a Moses basket.

4. Promoting Safer Sleep Messages and Addressing Safer Sleep Issues with families

The HIPS partnership has agreed to ensure that all safer sleep messages are delivered to parents and carers consistently across the areas. This will include adopting learning and responding to recommendations from both local and national child safeguarding practice reviews and/or thematic reviews around child deaths linked to safer sleeping arrangements. Any immediate safeguarding concerns should be addressed in a timely manner following local safeguarding children partnership (LSCP) procedures.

It is the practitioner’s responsibility to discuss and record the information they give to parents/carers about safer sleeping arrangements at all key contacts. Information must be provided in a manner that is understood by the parent/carer. For parents/carers who do not understand English, an approved interpreter should be used. Similarly, families with other communication needs should be offered information in such a way as best facilitates their understanding.

5. Working Together to reinforce safer sleep messages

3.19.1

Universal touch points at a glance

Antenatal

Birth

6-8 weeks

6 months

                                   1 year

Midwife

Health Visitor

Midwife

Health Visitor

Health Visitor

GP

Practice Nurse

Health Visitor

Practice Nurse

3.19.2

Multi-agency Approach

The list below highlights how agencies play a vital role in reinforcing safer sleep key messages (section 2) and preventing SIDS, resources to support parents, carers and professionals can be accessed here.

All agencies should follow their internal procedures for escalation of concerns around un-safe sleep practices and consider sharing information in line with safeguarding procedures.

3.19.3

Health Staff

All discussions concerning safer sleep messages should be documented in both professional records and the Personal Child Health Record (red book) where available.

The following opportunities have been identified as key “touch points” for agencies to deliver this information to families.

3.19.4

Midwifery

  • First discussed at antenatal appointments and during postnatal contacts. Discuss co-sleeping and infant safety and complete the Infant Feeding Checklist in the Maternity Care Record.
  • Discuss what has been purchased/sourced for the baby’s sleeping arrangements, i.e. cot, Moses basket, bedding and provide support for them to access financial aid if needed.
  • Following delivery, the same universal safer sleeping method applies – the safest place for the baby to sleep is in a cot/Moses basket, alongside the parent’s/carers bed.
  • The Midwife should document that safer sleep messages and arrangements have been discussed with expectant families within the Personal Child Health Record (red book).
  • Advice should be offered to address any apparent risk factors and ensure all advice regarding protective factors is clearly communicated. Any risk factors which have been identified and the subsequent action plan should be documented.
  • They should discuss the sleeping arrangements for the baby/infant with all known carers, including the father, grandparents, etc.
3.19.5

Health Visiting and Family Nurse Partnership Teams

  • To discuss at antenatal contact, new birth contact and postnatal contacts.
  • At the antenatal contact, the Health Visitor should discuss with parents/carers their plans for sleep arrangements for their new baby and begin to introduce the safer sleeping messages. This should be documented in the Parent Held Record if available (red book).
  • Check that they have a cot/Moses basket and provide support for them to access financial aid if needed.
  • They should discuss the sleeping arrangements for the baby/infant with all known carers, including the father, grandparents, etc.
  • At the new birth visit, the Health Visitor should revisit the safe sleep messages. This should be combined with a discussion on sleep routines during the day and night.
  • At the postnatal check, repeat as in new birth visit and clarify that safe sleep arrangements are in place. Should the parent choose to decline to follow the advice, this must be documented.
  • For Family Nurse Partnership teams (FNP), discussions as outlined above should take place during FNP pregnancy visits and revisited during postnatal contacts, agenda matched with the client.
3.19.6

General Practitioners (GPs)/All Practice Staff

  • GP’s and practice staff should be familiar with the safer sleeping messages and practice guidance and should encourage parents/carers of new babies and young children to be aware of safer sleep publicity materials
  • GP’s and practice staff who have consultations with pregnant women, their partner and parents of new or very young babies should use the opportunity to ask about sleeping arrangements for their baby and promote safer sleeping messages, highlighting the risks and protective factors.
  • GP’s or other health professionals who undertake the 6-8 week postnatal health review should ask about sleeping arrangements for the baby and promote safer sleeping messages, highlighting risk and protective factors
  • GP’s and practice staff should be mindful when prescribing medication that may cause drowsiness or other associated impairment to a parent of a child under the age of 3 years, in line with the offence of overlay.
3.19.7

Mental Health Services

  • When working with a family with a child less than 12 months of age in the household, mental health workers should discuss and promote the safer sleeping message.
  • They should discuss the sleeping arrangements for the baby/infant with all known carers, including the father, grandparents, etc.
  • Check that they have a cot/Moses basket and provide support for them to access financial aid if needed.
  • Ask the parent whether the baby sleeps in other places during the day, offering safer sleeping advice where appropriate e.g. not to be placed on the sofa.
  • They should routinely promote the message that the safest place for infants to sleep is in a cot /Moses basket in the same room as their parents for the first six months
  • Ask what arrangements are in place if the parent is taking prescribed medication for a mental health problem which may make them drowsy or sedated and could impact on their responsiveness or awareness.
  • Explore what arrangements they make for the baby if they choose to drink alcohol and/or take drugs as well as their prescribed medication.
  • Discuss the risks of sedation associated with medication, drugs and alcohol and the need to be particularly mindful at these times as to the risk of falling asleep with the baby.
  • Reinforce that clients should not co-sleep or share a bed, sofa or armchair with a baby.
  • Share information about discussions with the parent and any safer sleeping issues that have been identified with other workers involved with the family as appropriate
  • Record all discussions clearly on service user’s file as safer sleeping advice given and highlight any risk factors that the service user states they are to continue practicing
  • Document any advice that was given in cases where a service user is experiencing mental health problems and/or uses alcohol or substances and is pregnant
  • The mental health worker needs to discuss what plans the parents have and what have they purchased/sourced for their baby to sleep in. Liaise with other agencies if financial support is needed to purchase essential items.
  • Liaison with other professionals who are involved with the family should be considered where appropriate.
3.19.8

Substance Misuse Services

  • When working with a family with a child less than 12 months of age in the household, substance misuse workers should discuss and promote the safer sleeping message.
  • They should discuss all points as above.
  • Record all discussions clearly on the service user’s file as to safer sleeping advice given and highlight any risk factors that the service user states they are to continue practicing and what advice was given.
  • Liaison with other professionals who are involved with the family should be considered where appropriate.
3.19.9

Other Agencies

In addition to these touch points, it is agreed by the partnership that the ongoing promotion of safe sleep messages should be undertaken by all agencies that come into contact with children and families. This may include signposting and visual promotion, i.e. posters and leaflets.

3.19.10

Infant Feeding Workers (IFW)/Maternity Care Assistants (MCA)

  • Check the pregnant woman has received materials from her Midwife. If not, this should be referred to the local midwifery team or the Health Visiting Team.
  • Ask if the midwife discussed Safer Sleep after the mother and baby left the place of delivery. If not, this should be referred to the Midwifery team
  • If the Midwife has not yet visited, the IFW/MCA should remind the parent(s) of the key messages
  • Ask the parent to talk to other people who care for a baby about the safety measures
  • Discussions should be documented in the Personal Child Health Record (red book)
  • At breastfeeding support groups or baby’s first food groups, the safer sleeping messages should be reinforced
  • During brief telephone contacts it may not be appropriate to raise the issue of safer sleeping. However, during any phone discussion about managing the night feeds or baby’s sleep patterns, parents should be reminded about the key message on safer sleeping.
3.19.11

Breastfeeding Volunteers

  • Breastfeeding volunteers
  • They should support the consistent safer sleeping messages in their work in breastfeeding support groups, antenatal sessions and any other work place.
  • If they identify that a parent is unclear about the messages, they should speak to the Midwifery or Health Visiting team.
3.19.12

Children’s/Family Centres and Outreach Staff

  • Discuss safer sleep messages with parents/carers and signpost to appropriate health services as required
  • If any parent/carer is known to be using substances and/or alcohol, ask what arrangements they make for the baby to ensure their safety if they are going to drink or take drugs.
  • Highlight the specific risks regarding bed-sharing when under the influence of alcohol, drugs and if they smoke
3.19.13

Social Workers/Social Work Assistants

  • When Social Workers are undertaking an assessment and there is an infant under 12 months in the home, safe sleep messages as outlined in this procedure should be discussed with the parent/carers.
  • If parent/carer is pregnant, advice should be given about how the future parent can access financial support to purchase a Moses basket/cot, such as government grants, if unable to purchase by their own financial means
  • Continue the discussion to highlight other safety measures and explore any risk factors and what action needs to be taken to reduce risk; identify with all the adult carers in the home, including male carers, what practical steps can be taken to reduce risk
  • Highlight the specific risks regarding bed-sharing when under the influence of alcohol, drugs and if they smoke; be very clear that under no circumstances when they are under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs should they sleep with their baby in bed or on a sofa or armchair, and that the baby should be placed in a cot/Moses basket, which is of a size suitable to the baby with appropriate bedding, giving the baby room to breathe to ensure the baby cannot suffocate or overheat
3.19.14

Police

  • Police officers and staff attending incidents or visiting addresses should ensure that safeguarding of children is paramount.
  • In line with Voice of the Child- for residing children under 12 months they should, where practical and appropriate, establish where the infant sleeps and consider whether the environment follows the HIPS safer sleep advice.
  • When safer sleep risk factors have been identified or are suspected (co-sleep, alcohol/ drug use, sofa sleeping) they will signpost parents/ carers to advice on the Lullaby Trust/ Hampshire leaflet.
  • A record of this interaction and the potential risk should be submitted to MASH via a PPN1. 
  • This policy does not alter or in any way replace the power for Police Constables under S46 of the Children Act 1989 to remove a child where there is reasonable cause to believe the child would otherwise be likely to suffer significant harm.
  • Professionals should consider explaining the criminal offence of Overlaythis relates to the cause of death for an infant less than 3 years of age being due to suffocation (not caused by disease/ foreign body). For this offence criteria to have been met, the infant must have been in bed with a person who has attained the age of 16 years when that person was under the influence of drink or a prohibited drug either when they went to bed or at any later time before the suffocation (includes any kind of furniture or surface used for sleeping).
3.19.15

Probation

  • All probation staff working with individuals/families who have a child under 12 months of age should discuss safer sleeping arrangements and record accurately what was said and to whom.
  • Staff should share information about what was discussed and any safer sleeping issues that have been identified with other professionals involved with the family where appropriate.
3.19.16

Housing Officers/Agencies

  • Use any assessment tools, including during home visits, to identify any safer sleeping risk factors, such as drug/alcohol use, the baby is sleeping in a car seat, or is seen sleeping in a situation that does not follow the safer sleeping advice contained within this guidance
  • Share concerns with the parent/carer and work to support the parent/carer to access support from other professionals involved to make safer sleeping arrangements.
  • When supporting expectant families, housing staff should look to support the provision of an environment that facilitates parents being able to follow safe sleep messages, considering the facilities available or ensuring that accommodation is appropriately adapted to allow for safe sleep to take place.
3.19.17

Education/Early Years settings

  • Follow and practice safe sleep arrangements for those babies/children who are left in the care of the early years setting.
  • If discussions with parents/carers identifies concerns regarding sleeping arrangements at home, to discuss and explore safe sleep messages with parents and liaise with other professionals where appropriate and with consent where appropriate.
  • Actively promote safe sleep messages, including visual promotion with leaflets and posters.
3.19.18

Acute hospitals, Urgent Treatment Centres etc

  • If discussions with parents/carers identifies concerns regarding sleeping arrangements at home, to discuss and explore safe sleep messages with parents and liaise with other professionals where appropriate and with consent where appropriate.
  • Actively promote safe sleep messages, including visual promotion with leaflets and posters.
3.19.19

Top ] - [ Introduction ] - [ Aims ] - [ Safer Sleep Principles and Key Messages ] 
Promoting Safer Sleep Messages and Addressing Safer Sleep Issues with families ] 
Working Together to reinforce safer sleep messages ] - [ Safeguarding concerns - messages for all agencies/services ] - [ Safeguarding Concerns and escalation ] - [ References ]

6. Safeguarding concerns - messages for all agencies/services

Should a parent/carer choose not to follow safer sleep messages and advice, all professionals must document their concerns and any action taking to mitigate them. All professionals should consider making contact the family’s health visitor and ask for their advice, where appropriate and with consent.

The HIPS partnership have agreed to deliver the same key safe sleep messages across the areas, even if the resources used to do this differ. Some areas may use existing information from agencies such as The Lullaby Trust whilst others may develop their own resources. Fundamentally, the messages will be consistent and the areas will release uniformed media statements, campaigns and professional and public launches with the support of internal communications teams to ensure this joined up approach delivers the key safer sleep messages to all families.

7. Safeguarding Concerns and escalation

We all have a key role to play in safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children. Professionals must consider the points below and follow their internal procedures for escalation of safeguarding concerns in relation to un-safe sleep practices.

  • Safe Sleep Principles and Key Messages (section2) should be used to inform understanding of risk and protective factors in respect to safe sleep practices.
  • Practitioners should use all resources available to enable parents/ carers to make evidence based informed choices around safe sleep. This may include contacting the relevant health visitor for advice where appropriate and with consent.
  • Professionals should consider any barriers that may be impacting on parenting capacity (including learning difficulties, substance misuse mental health issues, poverty) and if concerns persist, including other safeguarding concerns, professionals should refer to the neglect guidance and local safeguarding procedures.
  • In all situations where un-safe sleep practice raises safeguarding concerns, the practitioner should follow their internal safeguarding procedure to seek guidance and supervision using the neglect guidance.

References

Child Accident Prevention Trust (CAPT) (2019). Keeping Your Baby Safe- Safe-Sleeping. Available at https://www.capt.org.uk/news/we-support-safer-sleep-week

Child Accident Prevention Trust (CAPT) (2019). Suffocation Prevention. Available at https://www.capt.org.uk/suffocation-prevention

Derby Safeguarding Children partnership (2016). Guidance to Support Safe Sleeping Practices in Babies and Infants. Available at https://www.proceduresonline.com/derbyshire/scbs/user_controlled_lcms_area/uploaded_files/guide_sup_safe_sleep.pdf

Hampshire and Isle of Wight Safeguarding Children Partnerships (2019) Every Sleep Counts Toolkit https://www.hampshirescp.org.uk/toolkits/every-sleep-counts-toolkit/

Hampshire and Isle of Wight Safeguarding Children Partnerships (2019) Every Sleep Counts https://www.hampshirescp.org.uk/toolkits/every-sleep-counts-toolkit/every-sleep-counts-toolkit-landing-page/practical-tools/promotional-materials/leaflet-and-poster/

NHS Choices (2019) Sudden Infant Death Syndrome- SIDS.  Available at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/sudden-infant-death-syndrome-sids/

NHS Choices (2019) Pregnancy and Baby- Reducing the Risk of Cot Death. Available at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/reducing-risk-cot-death/

Norfolk Safeguarding Children Partnership (2014). Safe Sleeping Guidelines for Professionals. Available at https://www.norfolklscb.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Safer-Sleeping-Guidelines-2014.pdf

Royal Colleges of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) (2019). Personal Child Health Record. Available at https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/resources/personal-child-health-record-pchr

The Lullaby Trust (2019) Safer Sleep Advice. Available at https://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/safer-sleep-advice/

The Lullaby Trust (2019) Using E-Cigarettes Around Your Baby. Available at https://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/safer-sleep-advice/e-cigarettes/

Wessex Healthier Together (2019). Keeping Your Child Safe- Safe Sleeping. Available at https://what0-18.nhs.uk/parentscarers/keeping-your-child-safe/safe-sleeping

This page is correct as printed on Wednesday 21st of October 2020 01:25:35 PM please refer back to this website (http://hipsprocedures.org.uk) for updates.
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