Top

Search

Results for:

1.1 Referrals

See also Good Practice supporting the Voice of the Child Procedure. For more information on responding to children disclosing abuse, see the NSPCC resources.

1.1 Referrals

Introduction - When a professional working in Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth or Southampton assesses that a child/family requires additional support, they need to complete an inter-agency referral or contact form as per local processes and share this with the relevant Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub

1.1 Referrals

Organisational responsibilities - Section 11 of the Children Act 2004 Places duties on a range of organisations, agencies and individuals to ensure their functions, and any services that they contract out to others, are discharged having regard to the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Anyone who has co

1.1 Referrals

Making a referral - New referrals on open cases should be made directly to the allocated worker for the child / family (or in their absence their manager or the duty social worker). For new referrals on closed or unknown children where the child/children have NOT suffered significant harm or are NOT in immedi

1.1 Referrals

Response to a referral - When a parent, professional, or another person contacts local authority children’s social care with concerns about a child’s welfare, it is the responsibility of local authority children’s social care to clarify with the referrer (including self-referrals from children and families):

1.2 Assessment Procedure

Focusing on outcomes - Every assessment should be focused on outcomes, deciding which services and support to provide to deliver improved welfare for the child. Where the outcome of the assessment is continued local authority children’s social care involvement, the social worker should agree a plan of action w

1.2 Assessment Procedure

Immediate protection - Where there is a risk to the life of a child or a likelihood of serious immediate harm, local authority social workers, the police or NSPCC should use their statutory child protection powers to act immediately to secure the safety of the child. If it is necessary to remove a child from the

1.2 Assessment Procedure

Further information - The International Child Abduction and Contact Unit Modern Slavery Act 2015 Child Protection: Working with foreign authorities (Gov.UK)

1.2 Assessment Procedure

Focusing on the needs and views of the child - Every assessment should reflect the unique characteristics of the child within their family and community context. Each child whose referral has been accepted by children’s social care should have their individual needs assessed, including an analysis of the parental capacity to meet tho

1.2 Assessment Procedure

Developing a clear analysis - The social worker should analyse all the information gathered from the assessment, including from a young carer’s, parent carer’s or non-parent carer’s assessment, to decide the nature and level of the child’s needs and the level of risk, if any, they may be facing. The social work

1.2 Assessment Procedure

Principles of a good assessment - Assessment should be a dynamic process, which analyses and responds to the changing nature and level of need and/or risk faced by the child from within and outside their family. It is important that the impact of what is happening to a child is clearly identified and that information is ga

1.3 Practice Guidance

Harm to unborn children - A local protocol enables practitioners to work together with families to safeguard unborn/newborn babies where risk is identified. It provides an agreed process between health agencies, social care and other agencies working with the mother and her family on the planning, assessment and ac

1.3 Practice Guidance

Significant harm - The Children Act 1989 (as amended by the Children Act 2004 and the Children and Social Care Act 2017) introduced Significant Harm as the threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life in the best interests of children. It sets out specific duties: section 17 of the Child

1.3 Practice Guidance

Early help - Providing early help is more effective in promoting the welfare of children than reacting later. Early help means providing support as soon as a problem emerges, at any point in a child’s life, from the foundation years through to the teenage years. Early help can also prevent further pr

1.3 Practice Guidance

Introduction - These Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth and Southampton (HIPS) child protection procedures set out how agencies and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. This guidance reflects the practice requirements referred to in Working Together to Safe

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Timescales - Southampton, Hampshire and Isle of Wight Initial strategy discussions for Southampton, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight are held in MASH on the same day the referral is made and for open cases held within one working day and ideally on the same day. The triage through MASH determines the ty

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Achieving Best Evidence Interviews - Any video-recorded interview serves two primary purposes. These are: Evidence gathering for use in the investigation and in criminal proceedings; and The evidence-in-chief of the witness. In addition, any relevant information gained during the interview can also be used to inform enquiries

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Child Protection Medical Assessments - When there is a suspicion or disclosure of child abuse and/or neglect involving injury, suspected sexual abuse or serious neglect, the child should be referred to children’s services (MASH). If the child appears in need of urgent medical attention, they should be taken to the nearest acc

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Outcomes of section 47 enquiries - Local authority social workers are responsible for deciding what action to take and how to proceed following section 47 enquiries. If local authority children’s social care decides not to proceed with a child protection conference then other practitioners involved with the child and fami

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Multi-agency assessment - A multi-agency assessment is the means by which Section 47 Enquiries are carried out. The assessment will have commenced at the point of receipt of referral and it must continue whenever the criteria for Section 47 Enquiries are satisfied. The conclusions and recommendations of the Section

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Children and Families Moving Across Local Authority Boundaries - Where a child moves during the course of a Section 47 enquiry, the investigation should be completed by the authority that commenced the enquiries. In some instances, it may be necessary for the receiving authority to ensure the safety of the child in such circumstances the receiving autho

1.4 Child Protection Section 47 Enquiries Procedure

Initiating Section 47 Enquiries - A section 47 enquiry is initiated to decide whether and what type of action is required to safeguard and promote the welfare of a child who is suspected of or likely to be suffering significant harm. A section 47 enquiry is carried out by undertaking or continuing with an assessment and fo

1.5 Child Protection Conferences

Initial child protection conferences - Following section 47 enquiries, an initial child protection conference brings together family members (and the child where appropriate), with the supporters, advocates and practitioners most involved with the child and family, to make decisions about the child’s future safety, health and

1.5 Child Protection Conferences

Child protection review conference - The review conference procedures for preparation, decision-making and other procedures should be the same as those for an initial child protection conference. Purpose: To review whether the child is continuing to suffer or is likely to suffer significant harm, and review developmental prog

1.5 Child Protection Conferences

Local procedures - For details of local procedures for child protection conferences, please contact your local children's services. 

1.5 Child Protection Conferences

Please see Working Together 2018 for details of the statutory requirements for child protection conferences. See also Escalation policy for the resolution of professional disagreement.

1.6 A Child-centred Approach to Safeguarding

Legislation - Anyone working with children should see and speak to the child; listen to what they say; take their views seriously; and work with them and their families collaboratively when deciding how to support their needs. Special provision should be put in place to support dialogue with children wh

1.6 A Child-centred Approach to Safeguarding

Children and young people's views - Children have said that they need: Vigilance: to have adults notice when things are troubling them; Understanding and action: to understand what is happening; to be heard and understood; and to have that understanding acted upon; Stability: to be able to develop an on-going stable relat

1.6 A Child-centred Approach to Safeguarding

This child centred approach is fundamental to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of every child. A child centred approach means keeping the child in focus when making decisions about their lives and working in partnership with them and their families. All practitioners should follow th

2.1 Complex and Organised Abuse

This procedure is currently under review.  Please see the following national guidance: Working Together to Safeguard Children: A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, 2010. Pages 194-195. Complex child abuse: Inter-agency issues

2.1 Complex and Organised Abuse

Further information - Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

2.2 Historical/Non-recent Abuse (Delayed Reporting)

Further information - Child Sexual Exploitation: Definition and Guide for Practitioners (DfE, February 2017) Child abuse concerns: guide for practitioners  Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual Abuse Barnardos - Child Sexual Exploitation Child sexual exploitation: Practice Tool (2017)  National Crime Agency - M

2.2 Historical/Non-recent Abuse (Delayed Reporting)

Additional local information - Missing, Exploited & Trafficked Children Information Guide Child Sexual Exploitation: Local resources

2.2 Historical/Non-recent Abuse (Delayed Reporting)

Adults who Disclose Childhood Sexual Abuse - Download the Adults who disclose childhood sexual abuse protocol.

2.2 Historical/Non-recent Abuse (Delayed Reporting)

Children who Disclose Abuse - Download the Children who disclose abuse protocol.

2.2 Historical/Non-recent Abuse (Delayed Reporting)

Non-recent abuse (also known as historic abuse) is an allegation of neglect, physical, sexual or emotional abuse made by or on behalf of someone. This can be either: someone who is an adult (18 years or over) and the allegation relates to an incident that took place when the alleged victim

2.3 Family Approach Protocol and Toolkit

The Family Approach Protocol and Toolkit was commissioned by the 4 Safeguarding Children Partnerships and 4 Safeguarding Adult Boards (4LSABs) in Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth and Southampton. The protocol was commissioned in response to findings from a range of reviews  across all

3.10 Sexually Active Children and Young People

Further information - Brook Sexual Behaviours Traffic Light Tool Missing, Exploited and Trafficked Information Guide 2018-2020

3.1 Children who are Neglected

Taking action - An early help assessment should be undertaken by a lead professional who should provide support to the child and family, act as an advocate on their behalf and coordinate the delivery of support services. Any frontline practitioner from any agency working with children, young people and fa

3.10 Sexually Active Children and Young People

Risks - Sexual abuse and exploitation of a child or young person involves an imbalance of power. Any assessment should seek to identify possible power imbalances within a relationship. These can result from differences in size, age, material wealth and/or psychological, social and physical develop

3.1 Children who are Neglected

Also see the local Neglect toolkits that are available: Southampton Portsmouth Hampshire and Isle of Wight

3.10 Sexually Active Children and Young People

Gillick competency and Fraser guidelines - The Gillick competency and Fraser guidelines help people who work with children to balance the need to listen to children’s wishes with the responsibility to keep them safe. The Fraser guidelines state that a doctor can give contraceptive advice and treatment to a girl under 16 provid

3.1 Children who are Neglected

Recognising neglect - Some of the following signs may be indicators of neglect: Children who are living in a home that is indisputably dirty or unsafe; Children who are left hungry or dirty; Children who are left without adequate clothing, e.g. not having a winter coat; Children who are living in dangerous cond

3.10 Sexually Active Children and Young People

Introduction - Instances of underage sexual activity may raise difficult issues for practitioners and need to be handled with sensitivity. Agencies should ensure that all children and young people are given appropriate protection from sexual abuse. It is the responsibility of all professionals to accurat

3.1 Children who are Neglected

Safeguarding Supervision - ‘Supervision is an accountable process which supports, assures and develops the knowledge, skills and values of an individual, group or team. The purpose is to improve the quality of their work to achieve agreed objectives and outcomes’ (Providing effective supervision CWDC/Skills for

3.1 Children who are Neglected

Missed Appointments/ Was Not Brought - Children and Family Engagement - Non-attendance at or repeated cancellations of appointments and lack of access to the child on visits are indicators that should increase concern about the child's welfare. All NHS providers should have policies for the management of children not brought to health care appointments. See th

3.1 Children who are Neglected

Effects of neglect - Children who have been neglected might experience short-term and long-term effects. These can include: problems with brain development taking risks, like running away from home, using drugs and alcohol or breaking the law getting into dangerous relationships difficulty with relationships l

3.10 Sexually Active Children and Young People

See the Brook Sexual Behaviours Traffic Light Tool for information on identifying and responding appropriately to sexual behaviours.

3.1 Children who are Neglected

What is neglect? - Working Together to Safeguard Children defines Neglect as: ‘the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal

3.11 Safeguarding Children and Young People Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism

Prevent and Channel - The current threat from terrorism and extremism can involve the exploitation of vulnerable people, including children and young people.  This can include involving them in extremist activity in the UK or abroad. Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty on sp

3.11 Safeguarding Children and Young People Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism

Indicators - The NSPCC list the following as signs that may indicate a child is being radicalised: isolating themselves from family and friends talking as if from a scripted speech unwillingness or inability to discuss their views a sudden disrespectful attitude towards others increased levels of anger

3.11 Safeguarding Children and Young People Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism

Definitions - ‘Radicalisation’ refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and extremist ideologies associated with terrorist groups. ‘Extremism’ is defined in the 2011 Prevent strategy as vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the r

3.11 Safeguarding Children and Young People Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism

Actions to be taken - If concerns are raised about the child or young person and radicalisation/violent extremism, the Referrals Procedure should be followed. The Prevent duty builds on existing local partnership arrangements. Local Safeguarding Partnerships are responsible for co-ordinating what is done by l

3.11 Safeguarding Children and Young People Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism

Further information - Prevent Strategy Prevent Duty Guidance: for England and Wales Channel Duty Guidance: Protection vulnerable people from being draw into terrorism ADCS resources Radicalisation and Extremism Educate Against Hate

3.12 Children Visiting High Security Psychiatric Services

Further information - Guidance on the High Security Psychiatric Sevices (2013)

3.12 Children Visiting High Security Psychiatric Services

Procedure for deciding requests for visits - The Department of Health Guidance on the High Security Psychiatric Services (Arrangements for Visits by Children) Directions 2013 - procedure is intended to work as follows: The patient makes a request in writing for a child to visit. This request must be forwarded promptly to the nominate

3.12 Children Visiting High Security Psychiatric Services

Mental Health Act Code of Practice - The revised Mental Health Act Code of Practice (as amended by the Mental Capacity (Amendment) October 2019) states that: All hospitals should have written policies and procedures regarding the arrangements for children and young people who visit patients in hospital and for visits to pa

3.13 Dangerous Dogs

National guidance - The Blue Cross Be Safe with Dogs Leaflet - Guidance for Families The Dogs Trust: Staying Safe With Dog  Kennel Club's Safe & Sound Programme with Resources for Schools Parent Tips - Keeping Babies and Children Safe Around Dogs in the Home (Institute of Health Visiting) 

3.13 Dangerous Dogs

The procedure is currently under review.

3.14 Children Exposed to Abuse through Digital Media

Risks - Sexting: the use of technology to generate images or videos made by children under the age of 18 of other children; images that are of a sexual nature and are indecent. See NSPCC guidance for professionals on Sexting. Social networking sites: are often used by perpetrators as a way to acc

3.14 Children Exposed to Abuse through Digital Media

Further information - thinkUknow Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre UK Safer Internet To report/remove content online, contact the site directly or via the Internet Watch Foundation Child Safety Online: A practical guide for parents and carers whose children are using social media Safeguarding chi

3.14 Children Exposed to Abuse through Digital Media

Protection and Action to take - Evidence of anyone accessing or creating indecent images of children must be referred to the Police and Children's social care, in line with the Referrals Procedure. Section 67 of the Serious Crime Act 2015 created a new criminal offence criminalising sexual communication with a child. Th

3.14 Children Exposed to Abuse through Digital Media

Introduction - Online abuse is any type of abuse that happens on the internet, accessed on mobile phones, laptops, computers, tablets, webcams, cameras and games consoles. Children and young people may experience different types of abuse: bullying-cyberbullying emotional abuse sexting sexual abuse sexual

3.14 Children Exposed to Abuse through Digital Media

Impact and issues - Children need to be aware of the impact that their online activity can have on both themselves and other people, and the digital footprint that they create on the internet. It’s easy to feel anonymous online and it’s important that children are aware of who is able to view, and potenti

3.15 Bruising in Infants who are not Independently Mobile

Bruising in young babies - Download Bruising in young babies: Information for parents and carers.

3.15 Bruising in Infants who are not Independently Mobile

Preliminary Paediatric Opinion on Likelihood of Abuse - Download the Preliminary Paediatric Opinion Form (PPOF)

3.15 Bruising in Infants who are not Independently Mobile

Download the Protocol for the management of actual or suspected bruising in infants who are not independently mobile.

3.16 Unborn Baby Safeguarding Protocol

Download the HIPS Unborn Baby Safeguarding Protocol.

3.17 Protecting Children who Move Across Local Authority Borders

Protocol on Child Abduction and Removal of Children of Concern from the UK - Download the HIPS Protocol on Child Abduction and Removal of Children of Concern from the UK

3.17 Protecting Children who Move Across Local Authority Borders

Download the Protocol for Protecting Children who Move Across Local Authority Borders.    

3.18 Child Sexual Abuse - Medical Examinations

Download the guide to medical examinations in suspected child sexual abuse (CSA).   

3.2 Children who are Exploited

CSE - Local resources - HIPS-wide: Missing, Exploited & Trafficked Children Information Guide Safe4Me: Community Partnership Information (CPI) Sharing Form Child Sexual Exploitation Risk Questionnaire (CSERQ4) Portsmouth: Child Exploitation Risk Assessment Toolkit Hampshire: Sexual Exploitation Risk Assessme

3.2 Children who are Exploited

Also see the procedure on Safeguarding Children and Young People Against Radicalisation and Violent Extremism

3.2 Children who are Exploited

Child Sexual Exploitation - Definition The sexual exploitation of children is defined as: Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexua

3.2 Children who are Exploited

Children affected by Gang Activity - The issue of most concern in the HIPS are is children and young people's involvement in the distribution of drugs. This could be through 'County Lines', a term used to explain gangs and organised crime groups from London and other areas using children and young people to traffic drugs. Or,

3.2 Children who are Exploited

Children from Abroad, Modern Slavery, Trafficking and Exploitation - This procedure is concerned with children arriving into the UK: in the care of adults who, whilst they may be their carers, have no parental responsibility for them in the care of adults who have no documents to demonstrate a relationship with the child alone in the care of agents. Unacco

3.3 Abuse of Disabled Children

Disabled children and the law - The Children Act 1989 (Section 17) clarified the position of disabled children as children in need and defined disability using a National Assistance Act 1948 definition as ‘a child is disabled if he is blind, deaf or dumb or suffers from mental disorder of any kind or is substantially a

3.3 Abuse of Disabled Children

Further information - Safeguarding Disabled Children: Practice Guidance

3.3 Abuse of Disabled Children

Vulnerability to abuse - Safeguarding disabled children’s welfare is everybody’s responsibility, and given that we know that disabled children are more vulnerable to abuse than non-disabled children, awareness amongst professionals about safeguarding disabled children and what constitutes best practice, is ess

3.3 Abuse of Disabled Children

What this means for practice - Disabled children are subject to the same procedures for initiating a strategy discussion, as non-disabled children. Where there are concerns about a child with disabilities a referral should be made in accordance with the Referrals Procedure. When undertaking investigations/assessments i

3.3 Abuse of Disabled Children

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA) defines a disabled person as someone who has “a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.” According to the DDA ‘substantial’ means

3.3 Abuse of Disabled Children

Indicators of possible abuse or neglect - When undertaking an assessment (and considering whether significant harm might be indicated) professionals should always take into account the nature of the child’s disability. The following are some indicators of possible abuse or neglect: A bruise in a site that might not be of concern

3.4 Bullying

Definition and types of bullying - Bullying is behaviour by an individual or group, repeated over time, that intentionally hurts another individual or group either physically or emotionally. Bullying can take many forms (for instance, cyber-bullying via text messages, social media or gaming, which can include the use of ima

3.4 Bullying

Signs of bullying - The NSPCC lists the following signs of bullying to watch out for: belongings getting 'lost' or damaged physical injuries, such as unexplained bruises being afraid to go to school, being mysteriously 'ill' each morning, or skipping school not doing as well at school asking for, or stealing,

3.4 Bullying

Further information - Preventing and Tackling Bullying (Department for Education) Cyberbullying: Advice for Headteachers and School Staff (Department for Education, 2015) Advice for parents and carers on cyberbullying (Department for Education, 2015) Ending gang violence and exploitation (Home Office, 2016) Por

3.4 Bullying

Dealing with and preventing bullying - All settings should have anti-bullying strategies and procedures on how to refer to Children's Social Care. See Referrals Procedure and Assessment Procedure. For further information on dealing with an preventing bullying in the school setting, see Preventing and Tackling Bullying (Departme

3.4 Bullying

See 'Further information' below for links to national guidance.  Please also see the Portsmouth Anti-Bullying Guidance (2018).

3.5 Looked After Children and Other Children Living Away From Home

Further information - Please see the following national guidance: NSPCC guidance on looked after chidren. Department for Education guidance on reducing criminalisation of looked after children and care leavers Department for Education guidance on promoting the education of looked-after children and previously

3.6 Fabricated or Induced Illness by Carers (FII)

There is considerable debate about the nature and definition of FII and there are many different terms. FII is not a disease and the RCPCH emphasises that the terms ‘fabricated illness’ or ‘Induced illness’ should be used as a descriptions not as diagnoses. FII might best be though

3.6 Fabricated or Induced Illness by Carers (FII)

National Guidance - Safeguarding children in whom illness is fabricated or induced  Fabricated or induced illness by carers (FII): a practical guide for paediatricians Perplexing presentations (including FII) Child Maltreatment: when to suspect maltreatment in under 18s. 

3.7 Harmful Sexual Behaviour

See the Brook Traffic Light Tool for more information on distinguishing between 'normal' age-appropriate behaviour and behaviour which causes concern.

3.7 Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Responding to harmful sexual behaviour - Concerns about the behaviour and safety of the children should be referred to Children social care, in line with the Referrals Procedure. Responses to children and young people’s HSB should reflect the level of risk and need they present, and should be at the least intrusive level requi

3.7 Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Assessment, support and treatment - Effective assessment should be multi-agency, child-focused and consider the unmet needs of the child, the underlying reasons or triggers for the behaviour, protective factors and strengths, and what can be done to reduce the HSB. This assessment will ensure the right level of response by s

3.7 Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Definitions - NSPCC Harmful Sexual Behaviour Framework: “Sexual behaviours expressed by children and young people under the age of 18 years old that are developmentally inappropriate, may be harmful towards self or others, or be abusive towards another child, young person or adult.” It is also usefu

3.7 Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Further information - Brook Sexual Behaviours Traffic Light Tool An evidence-informed framework for children and young people displaying harmful sexual behaviours  Sexually Harmful Behaviour - NSPCC research briefing Child's Play? Preventing Abuse Among Children and Young People (Stop It Now publication) Harmf

3.7 Harmful Sexual Behaviour

Signs and indicators - Children and young people demonstrate a range of sexual behaviours as they grow up, and this is not always harmful. Sexualised behaviour is often seen as a continuum with five stages: appropriate – the type of sexual behaviour that is considered 'appropriate' for a particular child depe

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

When a Child has been found - Safe and well checks Safe and well checks are carried out by the police as soon as possible after the child has returned. Their purpose is to check for any indications that the child has suffered harm, where and with whom they have been, and to give them an opportunity to disclose any offe

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Children who repeatedly run away or go missing - Repeatedly going missing should not be viewed as a normal pattern of behaviour. For example, repeat episodes of a child going missing can indicate sexual exploitation. In addition to strategies and issues already highlighted, the following should also be considered when dealing with this s

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Definitions - Child: anyone who has not yet reached their 18th birthday Young runaway: a child who has run away from their home or care placement, or feels they have been forced or lured to leave Missing child: a child reported as missing to the police by their family or carers Looked after child: a chi

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Children Missing from Care, Home and Education - It is known that children who go missing are at risk of suffering significant harm, and there are specific risks around children running away and the risk of sexual exploitation. The Hampshire Police Force, as the lead agency for investigating and finding missing children, will respond to

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Children Missing from Care - Looked after children are particularly vulnerable. Though the number of looked after children going missing is a small percentage of the overall number of children that go missing, it is disproportionately high compared with the children’s population as a whole. Care leavers Care leavers

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Children Missing from Home - Local authorities have safeguarding duties in relation to children missing from home and should work with the police to risk assess cases of children missing or absent from home and analyse data for patterns that indicate particular concerns and risks. When analysing trends and patterns in

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Children Missing from Education (CME) - Children missing education are children of compulsory school age who are not registered pupils at a school and are not receiving suitable education otherwise than at a school. Children missing education are at significant risk of underachieving, being victims of harm, exploitation or radic

3.8 Children and Families that go Missing

Further information - Statutory guidance on children who run away or go missing from home or care Department for Education, Children who run away or go missing from home or care Department for Education, Children Missing Education HM Inspector of Constabulary, Missing Children: Who Cares? The police response to

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Please see the self-harm pathway for further information.

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Issues - Information Sharing and Consent - The best assessment of the child or young person's needs and the risks they may be exposed to, requires useful information to be gathered in order to analyse and plan the support services. In order to share and access information from the relevant professionals the child or young person's

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Self-harm pathway - Download the Self-harm pathway.

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Further information - Self-harm in young people: information for parents, carers and anyone who works with young people Royal College of Psychiatrists The truth about self-harm – The Mental Health Foundation Suicide prevention: resources and guidance (GOV.UK) Suicide by Children and Young People 2017 (HQIP) W

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Indicators - The NSPCC has details of the warning signs to look for. These include: Physical signs of self-harm These are commonly on the head, wrists, arms, thighs and chest and include: cuts bruises burns bald patches from pulling out hair Young people who self-harm are also very likely to keep thems

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Action to be taken -  The NSPCC has detailed information on what action should be taken if a child is self-harming. This includes: Show understanding Talk it over Discover the triggers Build their confidence Choose who you tell carefully Help them find new ways to cope If hospital care is needed Where a child

3.9 Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviour

Definition - NHS England defines self-harm as: 'when somebody intentionally damages or injures their body. It’s usually a way of coping with or expressing overwhelming emotional distress.' The term self-harm rather than deliberate self-harm is the preferred term as it is a more neutral terminology re

4.1 Child Abuse Linked to Spiritual, Cultural or Religious Beliefs

Indicators - In working to identify such child abuse, it is important to remember that some children may display a combination of indicators of abuse, whilst others will attempt to conceal them. In addition to the factors above, there are a range of common features across identified cases. These indica

4.1 Child Abuse Linked to Spiritual, Cultural or Religious Beliefs

Further information - National Action Plan to Tackle Child Abuse Linked to Faith or Belief (2012) Safeguarding Children from Abuse Linked to a Belief in Spirit Possession (2007) An Exploration of Knowledge About Child Abuse Linked to Faith or Belief (2016)

4.1 Child Abuse Linked to Spiritual, Cultural or Religious Beliefs

Risks - The number of known cases suggests that only a small minority of people who believe in witchcraft or spirit possession go on to abuse children. However, the children involved can suffer damage to their physical and mental health, their capacity to learn, their ability to form relationships

4.1 Child Abuse Linked to Spiritual, Cultural or Religious Beliefs

Law - Children Act 1989 Section 47 of the Children Act 1989 empowers local authorities to investigate a referral that a child may have suffered or is at risk of suffering harm. It sets out what constitutes child abuse, which can include harm through witchcraft or spirit possession. Children Act

4.1 Child Abuse Linked to Spiritual, Cultural or Religious Beliefs

Protection and Actions - Any practitioner who comes in to contact with children should be able to recognise evidence that a child is being abused or neglected, and know what to do to safeguard and promote the welfare of a child. This may be the crucial intervention that protects the child from further abuse or neg

4.1 Child Abuse Linked to Spiritual, Cultural or Religious Beliefs

Definition - This procedure is about child abuse linked to faith or belief. This includes: belief in concepts of witchcraft and spirit possession, demons or the devil acting through children or leading them astray (traditionally seen in some Christian beliefs), the evil eye or djinns (traditionally kno

4.2 Female Genital Mutilation

Further information - Also see: Tackling Female Genital Mutilation in Hampshire: A partnership approach – 2016-2019 Tackling FGM on the Isle of Wight: A partnership approach (under review) Statutory guidance on Female Genital Mutilation. FGM Protection Orders: Factsheet Female Genital Mutilation and its Man

4.2 Female Genital Mutilation

Definition - FGM is child abuse and a form of violence against women and girls, and therefore should be dealt with as part of existing child and adult safeguarding/protection structures, policies and procedures. The practice is illegal in the UK and it is also illegal to take a British national or perm

4.2 Female Genital Mutilation

Factors indicating girls are at risk of FGM - The most significant factor to consider when deciding whether a girl or woman may be at risk of FGM is whether her family has a history of practising FGM. In addition, it is important to consider whether FGM is known to be practised in her community or country of origin. The age at which g

4.2 Female Genital Mutilation

Mandatory reporting of FGM - Healthcare professionals must report to the police any cases of female genital mutilation (FGM) in girls under 18 that they come across in their work. This duty came into force on 31 October 2015.  This duty applies to regulated health and social care professionals and teachers in England

4.2 Female Genital Mutilation

What to do if a child is suspected to be at risk of FGM - If one or more indicators for FGM are identified, the professional should consider whether the level of risk requires referral. It should be discussed with the named/designated safeguarding lead. If one or more serious or immediate risk are idenitified, or the other risks are sufficient

4.2 Female Genital Mutilation

Local information - Hampshire Safeguarding Children Partnership FGM resources: Update pending FGM Mandatory Reporting Duty – Under 18 Years FGM Reporting Duty – Over 18 Years FGM Prevalence Map Risk Assessment for Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

Further information - Multi-Agency practice guidelines: Handling cases of forced marriage (2014) Forced Marriage Unit (GOV.UK) Apply for a forced marriage protection order Protocol on the handling of 'so-called' Honour Based Violence/Abuse and Forced Marriage Offences between the National Police Chiefs' Council

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

Action to take - Where there are concerns about the welfare and safety of the child or young person, a referral should be made to Children's social care, in line with the Referrals Procedure. In cases of forced marriage, involving the family and the community may increase the risk of significant harm to th

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

The law and protection orders - The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 made it a criminal offence to force someone to marry: A person commits an offence in England and Wales if he or she: (a) uses violence, threats or any other form of coercion for the purpose of causing another person to enter into the m

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

Signs or indicators of forced marriage - Potential warning signs or indicators of a forced marriage include: Education: persistent absence from school; fear about forthcoming school holidays; decline in behaviour or performance; being withdrawn from school; not being allowed to attend extra-curricular activities. Health: being a

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

Consequences of honour based violence - Honour based violence is a violent crime or incident which may have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family or community. It is often linked to family members or acquaintances who mistakenly believe someone has brought shame to their family or community by doing someth

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

Consequences of forced marriage - Isolation is one of the biggest problems facing those trapped in, or under threat of, a forced marriage. They may feel there is nobody they can trust to keep this secret from their family and they have no one to speak to about their situation – some may not be able to speak English. Thes

4.3 Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence

Definitions - A forced marriage is where one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities or reduced capacity, cannot) consent to the marriage as they are pressurised, or abuse is used, to force them to do so. It is recognised in the UK as a form of domestic or child abuse and

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

Introduction - Substance misuse is the problematic use of drugs and/or alcohol. Substance misuse usually refers to someone who inappropriately uses or is dependent on illicit drugs, alcohol, prescription drugs or solvents; and their use of these is associated with having a harmful effect on the individua

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

How substance misuse affects children - Parental problem alcohol and drug use affects children and their experiences of family life in a number of ways. And it’s not just parent’s dependent alcohol and drug use which is a problem. Parents who are using alcohol and drugs at higher risk levels can also have an impact on childr

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

A Family Approach - Research and data show that many families face multiple, entrenched and serious problems that will have a serious impact on the children and adults within the family. Research suggests that a multi-agency, ‘family approach’ can be effective in helping families, even for those who have

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

Substance misuse in pregnancy - Substance misuse in pregnancy can have serious effects on the health and development of the child before and after birth. Not every woman who uses substances will need additional support or a referral to specialist services. Many other factors affect pregnancy outcomes, including poverty,

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

Further information - Adfam- support to families affected by drugs and alcohol. Nacoa - National Association for Children of Alcoholics Dual Diagnosis - A Good Practice Handbook NHS Choices Care Programme Approach Hidden Harm - Responding to the Needs of Children of Problem Drug Users NSPCC Learning from Seriou

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

What action can be taken - A referral to Children's social care in line with the Referrals Procedure should be made if there are concerns about a child living with parents with substance misuse. An assessment of the parent's capacity to meet the child's needs should take place to establish the impact on the child

5.1 Children living in households where there is substance misuse

See the Family Approach Protocol and Toolkit for more information.

5.2 Domestic Violence and Abuse

Safeguarding Children Exposed to Domestic Violence and Abuse is a resource that provides accessible, practical advice for front-line practitioners across the adult and children’s workforce who are working in situations where domestic violence and abuse is known or suspected. Download Dom

5.2 Domestic Violence and Abuse

Further information - Domestic Abuse Bill 2019 factsheets

5.3 Children of Parents with Mental Health Problems

See the Family Approach Protocol and Toolkit for more information. For national guidance, see the NSPCC guidance on how to help children living with parents with mental health problems. Parents with mental ill health may neglect their own and their children’s physical, emotional and

5.3 Children of Parents with Mental Health Problems

Action to take - A referral to Children's social care should be made where it is believed that a child of a parent with mental health problems may have suffered, or is likely to suffer significant harm.  

5.3 Children of Parents with Mental Health Problems

Impact of parental mental health problems on children - The NSPCC lists the potential impact on children when living with parents with mental health problems. These include: increased risk of developing behaviour problems such as physical aggression by the time they reach school age risk of developing mental health difficulties taking on a cari

5.3 Children of Parents with Mental Health Problems

Further information - NSPCC, Parental mental health: How to help children living with parents with mental health problems Think child, think parent, think family: a guide to parental mental health and child welfare Stress and resilience factors in parents with mental health problems and their children

5.4 Children of Parents with Learning Disabilities

Protocol for Children of Parents with Learning Disabilities - The HIPS Protocol for Children of Parents with Learning Disabilities has been written to address the needs of safeguarding and protecting children where the parent(s) have a learning disability, to support the parents and make the work undertaken effective and clear. It has been written fo

5.4 Children of Parents with Learning Disabilities

See the Family Approach Protocol and Toolkit for more information.

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Organised abuse - Investigators should be alert to signs of organised or widespread abuse and/or the involvement of other perpetrators or institutions. They should consider whether the matter should be dealt with in accordance with complex abuse procedures which, if applicable, will take priority. See Orga

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Referral to the DBS - The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) was established under the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 and merges the functions previously carried out by the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). The relevant legislation is set out in the Protection of

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Allegation meeting/discussion - Where an allegation meeting is considered appropriate, it will be called. However, if there is a Section 47 assessment and review meetings held as part of this, the Section 47 process will take precedence for the agenda and the allegation will be considered within the scope of that process

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Disciplinary action - Where a strategy meeting decides that police investigation or a referral to children’s social care is not necessary (or an investigation is complete, or there is no charge or prosecution), the LADO and the designated senior manager should discuss whether disciplinary action is appropriat

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Record keeping - Details of allegations that are found to have been malicious should be removed from personnel records. However, for all other allegations, it is important that a clear and comprehensive summary of the allegation, details of how the allegation was followed up and resolved, and a note of any

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Unsubstantiated, false and malicious allegations - False and malicious allegations are rare and may be a strong indicator of abuse elsewhere which requires further exploration. If an allegation is demonstrably false, or considered to be malicious, the employer, in consultation with the LADO, should refer the matter to children’s social c

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Further information - Keeping Children Safe in Education: Statutory Guidance for Schools and Colleges

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Local information - LADO Case Responsibility Protocol for Use with Other LADO Authorities

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Outcomes of allegation investigations - Employer should take into account the following definitions when determining the outcome of allegation investigations: Substantiated: there is sufficient identifiable evidence to prove the allegation. False: there is sufficient evidence to disprove the allegation. Malicious: there is suffi

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Allegations against staff outside of the workplace - If an allegation is about a member of staff but takes place outside of their work with children, the principles outlined in these procedures still apply. These concerns will be reported to the police or social care If an allegation or concern arises about the behaviour of a member of staff

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Introduction - Allegation – this is a technical term based on the definition provided by Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018. It is different to the dictionary definition of the word and the procedure still needs to be followed even if there is clear evidence that the incident has or has not ha

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Roles and Responsibilities - Working Together states: Organisations and agencies working with children and families should have clear policies for dealing with allegations against people who work with children. Such policies should make a clear distinction between an allegation, a concern about the quality of care or

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Confidentiality - Confidentiality should be maintained while an allegation is being investigated. Information should be restricted to those involved in the investigation or who need to know in order to protect children. The Education Act 2002 introduced reporting restrictions preventing the publication of a

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Responding to an allegation - When an allegation is first reported, the person to whom it is reported to should keep a written record of everything related to the allegations, including dates, times and places. They should report the allegations immediately to the designated/nominated person. The designated/nominated p

6.1 Allegations Against Staff or Volunteers

Whistleblowing - All staff should be made aware of the organisation's whistleblowing policy and feel confident to voice concerns about the attitude or actions of colleagues. If a member of staff believes that a reported allegation or concern is not being dealt with appropriately by their organisation, they

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Monitoring and Inspection - The Safeguarding Partnership 's work to ensure the effectiveness of work to safeguard and promote the welfare of children by member organisations will be a peer review process, based on self-evaluation, performance indicators and a joint audit. Its aim is to promote high standards of safeg

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Desired outcomes - The overarching outcome of the new arrangements is that children in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight should be safeguarded from harm.  More specifically, the intention is that new ways of working are based on the following principles: be designed to ensure that services are delivered in th

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Annual Business Plan - Each Safeguarding Partner will produce an annual business plan setting out: A work programme for the following year to include measurable objectives; Relevant management information of child protection activity in the previous year; Progress against objectives established for the year endi

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Ways of Working - The working practices of Safeguarding Partnership members will be considered locally with a view to securing effective operation of the LSCB functions and ensuring all member organisations are effectively engaged. It may be appropriate for the Safeguarding Partnership to set up working gro

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Related groups - The HIPS Executive will convene four standing subgroups where there is a clear benefit to coordinating specific areas of business across the HIPS area: Health group – This group will coordinate safeguarding business across the health economy across the HIPS area. It will take the lead on

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Chairing of a HIPS Executive - The HIPS Executive will be chaired by an Independent Chair newly recruited by the Safeguarding Partners for this role.

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Membership and frequency of HIPS Executive - To support this role and relationship of mutual accountability, the membership of HIPS will be focused to the three Safeguarding Partners across each of the four areas, namely: Directors of Children’s Services from each of the represented local authorities. Directors of Children’s Serv

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Role of HIPS arrangements and relationship with Local Safeguarding Children Partnership - The role of the HIPS Executive Group is to provide strategic direction and coordination of safeguarding activity across the pan Hampshire and Isle of Wight area, to promote best practice, implement local and national learning and identify issues requiring strategic intervention by the Safe

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Background - Working Together 2018 (WT2018) allows more flexibility for safeguarding arrangements to operate across larger areas/multiple local authority boundaries.  Early discussions in the Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCBs) across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight indicated that each local aut

7.10 Principles and Standards for Safeguarding Supervision

 Download the HIPS Principles and Standards for Safeguarding Supervision.

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Local partnerships arrangements: Southampton Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements Portsmouth Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements Isle of Wight Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements Hampshire Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

7.1 Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth & Southampton (HIPS) Safeguarding Children Partnership Arrangements

Safeguarding Partnership Annual Report - The Chair must publish an annual report on the effectiveness of child safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children in the local area (this is a statutory requirement under section 14A of the Children Act 2004). The annual report should be published in relation to the preceding finan

7.11 Commissioning Standards

Download the HIPS Best Practice Guide to Safeguarding Commissioning Standards.

7.12 MAPPA and HIPS Protocol

Download the protocol on the working arrangements between the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) Strategic Management Board and the Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth and Southampton Safeguarding Childrens Partnerships (HIPS) Procedures Group

7.2 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

A range of individual organisations and agencies working with children and families have specific statutory duties to promote the welfare of children and ensure they are protected from harm. These duties, as applied to individual organisations and agencies, are set out in this section. Thi

7.2 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

Individual organisational responsibilities - The roles and responsibilities of the following agencies are listed below, as per Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018. Schools, colleges and other educational providers The following have duties in relation to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children: governing bodies of

7.2 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

People in positions of trust - Organisations and agencies working with children and families should have clear policies for dealing with allegations against people who work with children. Such policies should make a clear distinction between an allegation, a concern about the quality of care or practice or a complaint.

7.2 Agency Roles and Responsibilities

Statutory duties under the Children Act 2004 - Section 11 of the Children Act 2004 Places duties on a range of organisations, agencies and individuals to ensure their functions, and any services that they contract out to others, are discharged having regard to the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Section 11 places

7.3 Escalation Policy for the Resolution of Professional Disagreement

Professional challenges should be seen as part of ‘healthy’ professional working relationships. Practitioners should be encouraged to give or receive professional challenge in a constructive and positive way. Successful joint working is reliant upon resolving disagreements effectively,

7.4 Learning and Improvement Framework

Hampshire National & Local Child Safeguarding Practice Review Procedure & Guidance - A function of the Hampshire Safeguarding Children Partnership is to conduct a Local Child Safeguarding Practice Review after a child has died or is seriously harmed as a result of abuse or neglect who’s permanent residence is within the Local Authority area.  This document sets out the

7.4 Learning and Improvement Framework

Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018 states that local arrangements must support and enable local organisations and agencies to work together in a system where learning is promoted and embedded in a way that local services for children and families can become more reflective and imp

7.4 Learning and Improvement Framework

Aim of the Local Framework - The aim of the framework is to enable local organisations to improve services through being clear about their responsibilities to learn from experience and particularly through the provision of insights into the way organisations work together to safeguard and protect the welfare of childr

7.5 Information Sharing

Myth-busting guide to information sharing - Sharing information enables practitioners and agencies to identify and provide appropriate services that safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Below are common myths that may hinder effective information sharing (Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018). Data protection legisl

7.5 Information Sharing

The General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) - Practitioners must have due regard to the relevant data protection principles which allow them to share personal information, as provided for in the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). To share information effectively: all practitioners should be con

7.5 Information Sharing

Introduction - Effective sharing of information between practitioners and local organisations and agencies is essential for early identification of need, assessment and service provision to keep children safe. Practitioners should be proactive in sharing information as early as possible to help identify,

7.5 Information Sharing

The seven golden rules to sharing information - Remember that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Data Protection Act 2018 and human rights law are not barriers to justified information sharing, but provide a framework to ensure that personal information about living individuals is shared appropriately. Be open and honest wit

7.5 Information Sharing

Caldicott Guardian Principles - A Caldicott Guardian is a senior person responsible for protecting the confidentiality of patient and service-user information and enabling appropriate information sharing. Effective safeguarding requires the judicious sharing of information about those at risk between the agencies inv

7.5 Information Sharing

Further information - Information sharing: advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO)

7.5 Information Sharing

Child Sex Offender Disclosure Scheme - The child sex offender disclosure scheme lets those who care for young people find out if a person has a record for child sexual offences. Find out more.

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel - Local authorities in England must notify the national Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel (the panel) if they know or suspect a child has been abused or neglected, and the child dies or is seriously harms in the local authority area. They must also notify the panel is a child who is n

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Decisions on local and national reviews - The safeguarding partnership must decide whether the incident meets the criteria for local review. Meeting the criteria does not mean that safeguarding partners must automatically carry out a local child safeguarding practice review. It is for them to determine whether a review is appropri

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Rapid Reviews - The safeguarding partners should promptly undertake a rapid review of the case, in line with any guidance published by the Panel. The aim of this rapid review is to enable safeguarding partners to: gather the facts about the case, as far as they can be readily established at the time discu

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Process of local reviews - The safeguarding partnership will commission a reviewer who has appropriate professional knowledge, understanding and practice, and the ability to recognise the complex circumstances in which practitioners work together to safeguard children. The methodology used during a review should pro

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Sometimes a child suffers a serious injury or death as a result of child abuse or neglect. Understanding not only what happened but also why things happened as they did can help to improve our response in the future. Understanding the impact that the actions of different organisations and

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Further information - Working Together 2018 NSPCC Serious Case Reviews Repository Serious Case Review Quality Markers - Supporting dialogue about the principles of good practice and how to achieve them

7.6 Serious child safeguarding incidents

Engagement of organisations - The Safeguarding Partnership will ensure appropriate representation in the review process of professionals and organisations involved with the child and family, establish timescales for action to be taken, agree success criteria and assess the impact of the actions. The review should be pr

7.7 Child Death Review Process

National Child Mortality Database - The National Child Mortality Database (NCMD) is a repository of data relating to all children’s deaths in England. It enables more detailed analysis and interpretation of all data arising from the child death review process, to ensure that lessons are learned following a child’s death

7.7 Child Death Review Process

Further information - Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy and Childhood - Multi-agency Guidelines for Care and Investigation (Royal College of Pathologists, endorsed by The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

7.7 Child Death Review Process

Notification and Reporting Forms - Child Death Notification Form Child Death Reporting Form   These forms should be completed and returned to the CDOP administrator at:  Secure email: WHCCG.HIPS.CDOP@nhs.net   Tel: 07467331482       All Child Death Reporting forms are available from the government website.    

7.7 Child Death Review Process

Child Death Review Process in the HIPS Areas - This guidance sets out the agreed process for implementing the Child Death Review procedure.  This should be read in conjunction with Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018, the Child Death Review Statutory and Operational guidance 2018  and the Sudden unexpected death in infancy an

7.7 Child Death Review Process

When a child dies, in any circumstances, it is important for parents and families to understand what has happened and whether there are any lessons to be learned. The responsibility for ensuring child death reviews are carried out is held by ‘child death review partners,’ who, in relat

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

Safer recruitment policy - A safe recruitment policy sets out an organisations commitment to recruiting staff and volunteers who are suitable to work with children. It should set out the organisation's commitment to: safeguarding and protecting all children and young people by implementing robust safer recruitment p

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

Regulated activity in relation to children - Regulated activity is work that a barred person must not do. It is defined in the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups (SVG) Act 2006 and the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups (Northern Ireland) Order 2007, both as amended (in particular by, respectively, section 64 and Schedule 7, Protection of Fr

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

Safer recruitment procedures - For any role working with children and young people, both the job description and the person specification should highlight the importance of understanding safeguarding issues. When advertising a role, include a statement about the organisation's commitment to keeping children safe. If cri

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

All organisations that employ staff or volunteers to work with children must adopt safe recruitment practices. Safe recruitment makes sure staff and volunteers are suitable to work with children and young people, and helps protect them from harm.

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

Local information - LADO Case Responsibility Protocol for Use with Other LADO Authorities

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

Further information - Equality Act 2010 Keeping children safe in education Disclosure and Barring Service website Care Quality Commission - Disclosure and Barring Service Checks NSPCC Safer recruitment

7.8 Guide to Safe Recruitment of Staff and Volunteers

Vetting candidates and DBS checks - Referees should be asked abou the candidate's suitability and ability to work with children, and their knowledge and experience of child protection and safeguarding. Follow up on any discrepancies or concerns. Discloure and Barring Service (DBS) If you are employing or assessing someone to

7.9 Whistleblowing

It is important for individuals to feel safe and listened to when raising concerns. An open approach to whistleblowing promotes the values of openness, transparency and candour and ensures wellbeing and safety of children and young people are part of the culture. It gives an opportunity

7.9 Whistleblowing

Who to contact about concerns - Employees should in the first instance follow their own organisation’s whistleblowing policies or procedures. If the issue that requires disclosure sits outside of these policies or procedures, or related to how board member agencies are operating together under the safeguarding partners

7.9 Whistleblowing

Further information - Whistle blowing helpline Raising Concerns at Work Whistle blowing to Ofsted about children's social care services: Policy and guidance for whistleblowers Complain about a school, or childminder Early years compliance handbook Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 Public Concern at Work What

7.9 Whistleblowing

The Professional Duty of Candour for Health Professionals - Every healthcare professional must be open and honest with patients when something goes wrong with their treatment or care which causes, or has the potential to cause, harm or distress. This means that healthcare professionals must: Tell the patient (or, where appropriate, the patient's ad

7.9 Whistleblowing

The Public Interest Disclosure Act - The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA) offers protection to workers from any detriment from their employer that arises from the worker making a ‘protected disclosure’. To qualify as a ‘protected disclosure’, the disclosure must satisfy a number of requirements: The worker m

8.1 Spotlight On... Community Partnership Information Form

The Safeguarding Children Partnerships across Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth and Southampton will be producing regular briefings to highlight changes and promote awareness and understanding of key policies. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the changes, and, circulate

9.1 Threshold documents and Inter-Agency Referral Forms

Early help - Inter-agency referral/contact form: Hampshire and Isle of Wight Portsmouth Southampton Threshold guidance: Hampshire Isle of Wight Portsmouth Southampton

9.2 Worried about a Child Leaflet

Health care professionals from across the HIPS area can download or print this leaflet which gives information to families about what action may be taken when there are safeguarding concerns about a child(ren). Download the Worried about a Child Leaflet.
This page is correct as printed on Wednesday 8th of April 2020 03:02:13 PM please refer back to this website (http://hipsprocedures.org.uk) for updates.
Close